Taiwan: An Old Crate of Memories

One of the things you learn when you go overseas is how much a lot of the countries overseas really just like to enjoy life.

– Chris Paul –

I accompanied my friend to apply for Taiwan and unexpected things happen.

A set of tests were given to applicants and the examiner accidentally gave me a set of questionnaires and I took and answered it for fun. After 2 hours, one of the employees from the Manpower Agency announced those applicants who made it and upon my surprise, I was on the top 3, and my friend didn’t make it on her first try. I didn’t expect it that would happen that fast, after three weeks I flew to Taiwan. I even quit my job and school. This was my first travel abroad.

It was May 5, 2000, when I left my country to become an Overseas Filipino Worker. I was assigned to a manual machine to produce chips. From white collar job to blue collar job but no regrets because it was 7x more bigger than my salary in my home country. The only problem is, this job is risky. Every day I inhaled solvent, the company see to it that we were in good condition all the time so we had medical check-ups every six months.

After a year, I was assigned as a line leader and dormitory supervisor. So much pressure that I even quit my job and had a breach contract. I went home in May 2002. At that time, the company, I mean most of the companies in Taiwan were in crisis, so it was just a perfect timing for me to go back home.

In my two years in Taiwan, many memories were created. A set of new friends and friends up to this pointing time. I believe that when you live under the same roof, a more genuinely camaraderie will developed. And I agree because I can confess to them anything under the sun than with my old friends. Friendship is not how long you’ve been together but it’s how you value someone else genuinely. Through fights and being sulky at one another is just a test if you accept not only their good sides but also their weaknesses. I experienced all that, and proud to say we still remain friends.

 

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Leefo Village Theme Park, Hsinchu

 

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Nantou, Taiwan

 

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Prosperity Dielectrics Company, Nantou

 

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Taitung

 

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Prosperity Dielectrics Company, Nantou

 

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Taitung

 

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Chrismas Party, Nantou

 

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Chiang Kai-Shek, Taipei

 

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Daan Park, Taipei

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Siem Reap: Ta Prohm

Ta Prohm is formerly known as Monastery of the King, a Buddhist temple.  It is a combination of jungle, nature and man-made art.

After Angkor Thom Complex, Ta Prohm is the most famous of all temples.  I hadn’t watched the movie Tomb Raider yet and just recently found out when I was in this location that the cast and crew did indeed shoot the film in this temple.  The entrance alone is magical, it’s like a jungle hopeful for Tarzan to rope swing on his forceful strength.

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The photo is the famous “Tomb Raider” tree.  Everyone is keen to pose and take a closer look at the tree.  Since the weather is sunny and I was with elders, we didn’t lineup for close-up photos.

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When we visited this place, the restoration is in the process.  They said, restoring the area is a challenging one because of the huge trees growing over the structures.

Even with big crowds, a sunny day, and how the buildings and nature have become one is fascinating.

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The charm of those gigantic trees and how the roots covered the architecture is mythical. I don’t really mind walking under the sun with a massive crowd if the reward is pleasant to look at.

Part 1: Crossing Cambodia From Vietnam

Part 2: Siem Reap: Angkor Thom Complex